Top ten romantic weather phenomena

12 02 2013

With Valentine’s day this week, we’ve complied the top ten romantic or magical weather conditions.

1. Diamond dust – Diamond dust consists of extremely small ice crystals, usually formed at temperatures below -30 °C. The name diamond dust comes from the sparkling effect created when light reflects on the ice crystals in the air.
2. Sunset – Sunsets are colourful because the light from the setting sun has to travel through more of the atmosphere to reach us. This means more of the blue light from the sun is scattered away from us, so we can see more of the red light.
3. Crepuscular rays – This phenomenon occurs when light from the rising or setting sun is scattered, producing sunbeams.
4. Iridescent clouds – A pretty display of iridescent colours in a cloud is most commonly seen in high level cumulus clouds.
5. Dew – Very small droplets of water which form during calm weather as the air cools. The process of droplets settling is called ‘dew-fall’.
6. FrostFrost forms on still, clear and cold nights. The cool air causes water vapour in the air to condense and form droplets. When the temperature of the ground or surface is below 0 °C the moisture freezes into ice crystals.
7. Double rainbow – Magical as they may seem, a double rainbow occurs when a secondary rainbow forms outside of the brighter, primary rainbow. The colour sequence is reversed because the light has been reflected within each raindrop a second time. As the light has been refracted twice, the secondary rainbow will not be as bright.
8. Snowflakes – Every single snowflake is unique, but because molecules in the ice crystals that make up snowflakes join together in a hexagonal structure they always have six sides.
9. Heart shape cloudsClouds can form in virtually any shape, and sometimes you may see some that look like things, even hearts.
10. Halo – A halo can appear around the sun or the moon, and although they may look angelic, can often signify that a weather front is approaching.


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One response

12 02 2013
Christine A Baker

Thanks very much for these fabulous photos. I also particularly like the links to explanation of the features mentioned.

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