Rain over the Bank Holiday Weekend, with more to come

27 05 2014

The Bank Holiday weekend saw a good deal of dry and bright weather in places, but there was also heavy rainfall in some spots over the three days with some significant rainfall totals.

Much of England and Wales had a wet Saturday as rain pushed northwestwards with heavy, and thundery showers following.

Sunday brought heavy showery rain to western and northern parts of the UK, with 25 mm of rain falling in three hours around the Edinburgh area.

Heavy rain pushed in from the southeast on Bank Holiday Monday, whilst to the west and north of this there was some sunny weather, but also heavy and thundery showers for Cornwall, Northern Ireland and Scotland.

Here are the highest UK rainfall totals for each of the three days of the Bank Holiday:

 

Rainfall totals from 0900 Saturday 24 May – 0900 Sunday 25 May
Site Area Amount (mm)
Liscombe Somerset 32.2
Usk Monmouthshire 29.0
Tredegar Gwent 23.4
Okehampton Devon 22.5
Waddington Lincolnshire 22.0
Sheffield South Yorkshire 22.0

 

Rainfall totals from 0900 Sunday 25 May – 0900 Monday 26 May
Site Area Amount (mm)
Edinburgh, Gogarbank Midlothian 26.2
Cardinham Cornwall 17.8
Edinburgh, Royal Botanic Garden Midlothian 17.4
Tyndrum Perthshire 17.2
Camborne Cornwall 14.2

 

Rainfall totals from 0900 Monday 26 May – 0900 Tuesday 27 May
Site Area Amount (mm)
Wattisham Suffolk 31.2
Brooms Barn Suffolk 25.4
Cavendish Suffolk 21.8
Charsfield Suffolk 19.2
Cambridge Cambridgeshire 17.0

 

Looking ahead through the rest of this week there is more rain to come, particularly for eastern and northeastern England, while Scotland (especially the north) has the best of the warm, sunny weather.

Suffolk has already seen heavy rainfall through Tuesday morning with over 30 mm of rainfall at Wattisham through the first 9 hours of the day.

This is going to push northwards through Tuesday into Norfolk and Lincolnshire. A Met Office yellow warning has been issued to warn of rainfall amounts reaching around 30mm in some spots which could lead to some localised flooding.

There are also going to be some heavy showers over southern parts of Wales and parts of the West Country.

Wednesday will again be wet for many, especially around northeast England with parts of Yorkshire at risk of over 30 mm, for which another yellow rainfall warning has been issued. With strengthening winds this will make it feel quite unpleasant at times.

More showers or longer spells of rain are expected for Thursday, before things should turn generally drier, brighter and warmer by the weekend.





The worst storm in years?

28 01 2013

Various articles in the news today said that the weather over the weekend was the worst storm to hit the UK in years, and that there is more to come this week. There was indeed a very deep area of low pressure in the Atlantic over the weekend. At its deepest, on Saturday 26 January, the central pressure of the depression was 932 millibars and it was sitting some 1,800 nautical miles west of the UK. It came closest to the UK during the day yesterday with a central pressure of 950 millibars but was still around 600 nautical miles to the north west of Scotland.

Satellite image from 26 January 2013

Satellite image from 26 January 2013

To put this into context, the storm that affected the UK on 3 January 2012 had a central pressure of 953 millibars but was centred right on the west coast of Scotland and brought winds in excess of 80 mph to the Central Belt and a gust of over 100 mph in Edinburgh. Property was damaged, as well as trees, and there was disruption on the road network and with ferry crossings. Power supplies were also affected significantly.

The storm in January 2012 was therefore much more disruptive and severe than any wet and windy weather we have seen so far this year.

Much of the recent severe weather has been attributed to the phrase “Weather Bomb”, which is not a perfect meteorological term but is defined as an intense low pressure system with a central pressure that falls 24 millibars in a 24-hour period. This happened to the depression over the Atlantic during the weekend but as it was miles away from the UK its impacts were minimal. A better description can be more directly linked to the meteorological phenomena known as rapid cyclogenesis. This is where dry air from the stratosphere flows into an area of low pressure. This causes air within the depression to rise very quickly and increases its rotation, which in turn deepens the pressure and creates a more vigorous storm.





Updated: Latest snow depths Friday 18 January

18 01 2013

As forecast, many areas of the UK have had heavy snowfall today, particularly in Wales and the south and west of England.

The heaviest snowfall so far has been in Wales, where a red warning is currently in place. Sennybridge in Powys currently has the highest total, with 26 cm of snow recorded at 12 pm today.

somersetsnow

Updated snow depths at 12 pm Friday 18 January

Location Area Elevation Snow depth ( Cm)
Sennybridge Powys 307 26
Dunkeswell Aerodrome Devon 252 15
Filton Avon 59 12
Larkhill Wiltshire 132 11
Liscombe Somerset 348 11
Middle Wallop Hampshire 90 11
Brize Norton Oxfordshire 82 10
Leek, Thorncliffe Staffordshire 298 9
Hereford, Credenhill Hereford & Worcester 76 9
Hurn Dorset 10 6
St Athan South Glamorgan 49 6
Boscombe Down Wiltshire 126 6
Northolt Greater London 33 5
Coleshill Warwickshire 96 5
Aviemore Inverness-Shire 228 5
Boulmer Northumberland 23 5
Trawsgoed Dyfed 63 4
Marham Norfolk 21 4
Shawbury Shropshire 72 4
Scampton Lincolnshire 57 4
Eskdalemuir Dumfriesshire 236 4
Wattisham Suffolk 89 4
Nottingham, Watnall Nottinghamshire 117 4
Wittering Cambridgeshire 73 3
Leconfield Humberside 7 3
Cranwell Lincolnshire 63 3
Dyce Aberdeenshire 65 3
Bingley West Yorkshire 262 3
Odiham Hampshire 118 3
Bridlington Mrsc Humberside 15 3
Heathrow Greater London 25 2
Charlwood Surrey 67 2
Andrewsfield Essex 87 2
Benson Oxfordshire 57 2
Coningsby Lincolnshire 6 2
Church Fenton North Yorkshire 8 2
Rostherne Cheshire 35 2
Albemarle Northumberland 142 2
Redesdale Camp Northumberland 211 2
Aboyne Aberdeenshire 140 2
Yeovilton Somerset 20 1
Aberporth Dyfed 133 1

Snow depths at 2 pm Friday 18 January

Location Area Elevation Snow depth ( Cm)
Sennybridge Powys 307 25
Filton Avon 59 15
Larkhill Wiltshire 132 12
Liscombe Somerset 348 12
Hereford, Credenhill Hereford & Worcester 76 11
Middle Wallop Hampshire 90 11
Brize Norton Oxfordshire 82 11
Leek, Thorncliffe Staffordshire 298 10
Coleshill Warwickshire 96 7
Northolt Greater London 33 7
Boscombe Down Wiltshire 126 7
Shawbury Shropshire 72 7
Hurn Dorset 10 7
St Athan South Glamorgan 49 5
Scampton Lincolnshire 57 4
Nottingham, Watnall Nottinghamshire 117 4
Eskdalemuir Dumfriesshire 236 4
Marham Norfolk 21 4
Yeovilton Somerset 20 4
Heathrow Greater London 25 4
Charlwood Surrey 67 4
Odiham Hampshire 118 4
Wattisham Suffolk 89 4
Trawsgoed Dyfed 63 4
Wittering Cambridgeshire 73 4
Aboyne Aberdeenshire 140 3
Leconfield Humberside 7 3
Cranwell Lincolnshire 63 3
Dyce Aberdeenshire 65 3
Waddington Lincolnshire 68 3
Boulmer Northumberland 23 3
Leeming North Yorkshire 33 3
Bingley West Yorkshire 262 3
Bridlington Mrsc Humberside 15 3
Benson Oxfordshire 57 3
Andrewsfield Essex 87 2
Church Fenton North Yorkshire 8 2
Rostherne Cheshire 35 2
Albemarle Northumberland 142 2
Redesdale Camp Northumberland 211 2
Coningsby Lincolnshire 6 2
Bedford Bedfordshire 85 2

Snow depths at 3 pm Friday 18 January

Location Area Elevation Snow depth ( Cm)
Sennybridge No 2 Powys 307 25
Filton Avon 59 16
Dunkeswell Aerodrome Devon 252 15
Larkhill Wiltshire 132 12
Brize Norton Oxfordshire 82 12
Liscombe Somerset 348 12
Hereford, Credenhill Hereford & Worcester 76 12
Middle Wallop Hampshire 90 10
Leek, Thorncliffe Staffordshire 298 9
Coleshill Warwickshire 96 8
Northolt Greater London 33 8
Boscombe Down Wiltshire 126 7
Shawbury Shropshire 72 7
Hurn Dorset 10 7
Nottingham, Watnall Nottinghamshire 117 6
Heathrow Greater London 25 5
Marham Norfolk 21 5
Odiham Hampshire 118 5
Aviemore Inverness-Shire 228 5
Cranwell Lincolnshire 63 4
Eskdalemuir Dumfriesshire 236 4
Scampton Lincolnshire 57 4
Yeovilton Somerset 20 4
Charlwood Surrey 67 4
Wittering Cambridgeshire 73 4
Wattisham Suffolk 89 4
Trawsgoed Dyfed 63 4
St Athan South Glamorgan 49 4
Benson Oxfordshire 57 3
Leeming North Yorkshire 33 3
Lough Fea Londonderry 225 3
Waddington Lincolnshire 68 3
Bridlington Mrsc Humberside 15 3
Leconfield Humberside 7 3
Bedford Bedfordshire 85 3
Aboyne No 2 Aberdeenshire 140 3
Dyce Aberdeenshire 65 3
Bingley, No 2 West Yorkshire 262 3
Church Fenton North Yorkshire 8 2
Coningsby Lincolnshire 6 2
Andrewsfield Essex 87 2
Rostherne No 2 Cheshire 35 2
Boulmer Northumberland 23 2

Further snowfall is forecast today and tomorrow. Keep up to date with your local forecasts and warnings for the latest information.

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Rainfall totals update

23 11 2012

The table below shows total rainfall from midnight on the 20th November until 7.00 am this morning. Some areas have had over 90 mm of rain over the last three days.

Location Total (mm)
Exeter Airport                       92
Tyndrum 91
Westonbirt                           79.2
Shap                                 73.2
North Wyke                           72
Usk    69.6
Filton                               67.6
Libanus                              67.6
Winchcombe    65.8
Capel Curig 65.6
Tredegar 64.4
Brize Norton                         63.6
Skye: Lusa                           63.4
Little Rissington                    62.8
Liscombe                             62.6
Yeovilton                            60.8
Cardiff                 60.8
Cluanie Inn                 59.8

Further rainfall is expected over the weekend. Keep up to date with weather warnings from the Met Office and flood warnings from the Environment Agency.

Satellite and rainfall radar showing the weather from midnight Tuesday 21st November to the morning of the 23rd November.





Heavy rain in the west but very warm in the south east

17 08 2012

The UK’s weather will see marked contrasts over the next few days – with heavy rain in the west today and very warm weather in the south east.

Forecasters at the Met Office have issued severe weather warnings for the rain across parts of western Britain today.

Rainfall amounts could reach 60 mm or more in parts of Wales and northern England, accompanied by strong winds. This could cause some disruption in places. The rain will ease during the early hours of Saturday morning.

Met Office radar image from 17 August 2012

Met Office radar image from 17 August 2012

In the South East of England, it will be much drier and will become oppressively hot as warm and humid air spreads up from continental Europe.

Temperatures are expected to rise into the high 20s Celsius today and over the weekend, and perhaps even the low 30s Celsius in parts of Kent and East Anglia on Sunday.

It remains to be seen whether the temperature will rise above the hottest seen so far this year, with 30.7 °C at St James’s Park in London on 25 July.

Temperatures on 17 August 2012

Temperatures on 17 August 2012

While it will be mainly dry in the South East, there will be some cloud around and any sunshine will be quite hazy with fog lingering along some coasts. There may even be a few thundery showers later on Sunday.

Met Office Chief Forecaster Martin Young said: “While it will be hot in the South East, we’re not expecting wall-to-wall sunshine and it will feel quite humid and oppressive over the weekend. As we head into next week, south westerly winds will push that humid air away to bring fresher conditions, and showers to north west Britain.”

For the latest information, keep up to date with our online online forecasts and warnings.








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